Shrimp Salad With Lemon Dill Vinaigrette Recipe

SHRIMP SALAD WITH LEMON DILL VINAIGRETTE RECIPE + JERRY CLOWER HUMOR + FASCINATING FACTS AND VINTAGE MOVIE POSTER ART

Wednesday greetings, friends!

It’s Wild!  We’re more than half way through the year and almost half way through July.
Pzzzzapp – fast is time.

Presenting Wednesday Reader this July 10 full of fun interestings.

BEGINNING WITH:

LESLIE ELMAN’S FASCINATING FACTS AND TRIVIA
Leslie is a grand collector of all things interesting and bet-ya-didn’t know that!
But now we do!

QUICK QUESTION
Would I return a bowl of soup or salad or anything for that matter if there was a hair in it at a restaurant?
Quick answer – In a nanosecond!
I wouldn’t be crummy about it.  I’d just point it out and ask for a do-over of whatever it happened to be.  You?

JERRY CLOWER’S STORY
About Marcel and the City Fellow is a hoot.
Jerry Clower is such a one-of-a-kind story teller!

HELLO SHRIMP SALAD AND DILL VINAIGRETTE RECIPE
A beautiful, delicious, simple, summertime on a plate!

TRACY BECKERMAN
Never fails to bring laughter in her slice-of-life writing style and sooooo relatable!

THANKS OUTSTANDING READERS
For giving us a piece of your Wednesday + sharing + caring.
It matters a lot!

Here we go!
Enjoy the read.
Catch ya Friday.
Same time.
Same place.

POP Quiz

POP QUIZ

  1. WHICH OF THESE HORROR FILM ICONS WOULD BE DESCRIBED AS LYCANTHROPE?
    a) Creature of the Black Lagoon
    b) Dracula
    c) The Mummy
    d) The Wolfman
  2. TALIA SHIRE, WHO PLAYED ADRIAN IN THE “ROCKY” MOVIES, IS THE SISTER OF WHICH HOLLYWOOD HEAVYWEIGHT?
    a) Francis Ford Coppola
    b) Robert De Niro
    c) Al Pacino
    d) Sylvester Stallone
  3. THE OLDEST SURVIVING ECCLESIASTICAL STAINED GLASS WINDOWS ARE THE “PROPHET WINDOWS” IN WHAT CITY’S CATHEDRAL?
    a) Assisi, Italy
    b) Augsburg, Germany
    c) Canterbury, England
    d) Nantes, France

Flash Cordons Trip to Mars

QUICK QUESTION

IF THERE WAS A HAIR IN YOUR SOUP
OR SALAD AT A RESTAURANT –
WOULD YOU RETURN IT?

Shrimp Salad

POP QUIZ ANSWERS

  1. The word lycanthrope derives from the Greek words for “wolf man.”
  2. Talia Shire, who played Adrian in the “Rocky” movies, is the sister of director Francis Ford Coppola.
  3. The oldest surviving ecclesiastical stained glass window is in a cathedral in Augsburg, Germany.

MARCEL AND THE CITY FELLOW
BY JERRY CLOWER

One day, me and Marcel Ledbetter was laying by a patch of corn.  We had throwed some whippoorwill peas down in the water furrow, where that old Sutton spring-tooth harrow would roll them peas around.  They would come up and we could have us some fall peas to eat.  This fellow come driving up in one of them A-model cars.  He jumped out and said, “Hey, boy.”

Marcel said, “You talkin’ to me?”

He said, “Yeah.”

Marcel said, “Whoa, Della.  What you want city fellow?”

He said, “These rows you plowing here, they sure are crooked.”

Marcel Ledbetter said, “You can grow just as much corn on a crooked row as you can on a straight one.”

The fellow said, “Well, the corn shore is yellow.”

Marcel said, “We planted yellow corn.”

The fellow said, “Well, there ain’t very much between you and a fool, is it?”

Marcel said, “Nothing but a fence.”

~ Copyright 1992, Jerry Clower
STORIES FROM HOME
Reprinted with permission, University Press of Mississippi

ONE DAY, IF YOU HAVE A LITTLE BIT
OF TALENT AND A LOT OF HARD WORK
YOU’RE GOING TO FIND OUT WHO YOU ARE.
~ Massimo Bottura ~

INSTANT KARMA

LET THE PAST STAY THERE.

RIDDLE ME THIS

WHAT COMES DOWN BUT NEVER GOES UP?

Shrimp Salad

SHRIMP SALAD WITH LEMON-DILL VINAIGRETTE

You can cook the shrimp and toss it with the vinaigrette a day in advance, then mix with the vegetables just before serving.  The Lemon-Dill Vinaigrette is also delicious drizzled over grilled fish or a cucumber. avocado, tomato side salad.

HERE’S HOW WE MAKE IT
INGREDIENT LIST:

  • 3 bay leaves
  •  2 TBSP white distilled vinegar or white wine vinegar
  • 2 pounds fresh jumbo shrimp, shells on
  • 1/2 pound snow peas or sugar snap peas
  • 1 red bell pepper, cored seeded, and julienned
  • 3 scallions, trimmed and julienned
  • 3 large carrots, peeled and julienned
  • 2 TBSP chopped fresh dill
  • 2 TBSP peeled, finely minced fresh ginger
  • 1 cup Lemon-Dill Vinaigrette
    (recipe follows)
  • Fresh mixed greens, washed and dried
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

NOW:

  1. Combine about 2 1/2 quarts water, bay leaves and vinegar in a large pot and bring to a boil.
  2. Add the shrimp and cook 2 – 3 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until firm and pinkish in color.
    (Caution – do not overcook or the shrimp will be tough).
  3. Remove  from the heat.  Drain.  Rinse shrimp with cold water until cooled.
  4. Peel the  shrimp, leaving the tail section intact; set aside to drain.
  5. Meanwhile, bring a large saucepan of water to a boil.
  6. Add the snow peas and cook about 1 minute, until bright green and crisp-tender.
  7. Drain immediately.
  8. Immerse the peas in a bowl of cold water to stop the cooking process.  Set aside to drain thoroughly.
  9. Combine the prepared red bell pepper, scallions, carrots, snow peas, dill, ginger, vinaigrette, and fresh mixed greens in a large bowl with the shrimp.
  10. Serve immediately or refrigerate until ready to serve.

SERVE:

On pretty salad plates with a fat slice of a fresh, bakery made crusty bread ((think baguette))
And a glass a crisp white wine or tall iced tea.

LEMON-DILL VINAIGRETTE
makes about 1 1/2 cups

  • 1/4 cup white wine vinegar
  • grated zest and juice of 2 large lemons
  • 2 TBSP peeled, grated fresh ginger
  • 2 TBSP minced, fresh dill
  • 1/4 cup canola or safflower oil
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

COMBINE:

  1. The vinegar, lemon zest, lemon juice , ginger, and dill in a bowl.
  2. Slowly add the canola oil and olive oil and whisk until all the oil is incorporated.
  3. Season with salt and pepper and refrigerate in an airtight container until ready to use or up to a week.

~ Hippie Cowboy recipe box

RIDDLE ANSWER

RAIN

Shrimp Salad

LOST IN SUBURBIA

A WOLF IN MOM’S CLOTHING
BY TRACY BECKERMAN

” I think I’m turning into a werewolf,” I told my dermatologist as I sat on the examining table in here office.  There were posters on the wall and pamphlets for the treatment of wrinkles and fat, but nothing for werewolves.

“Why do you think that?”  she said peering at my pores.  A thankless job if ever there was one.

“I’m starting to grow hair everywhere,” I told her.

“Do you howl at the moon at night?”  she asked.

“No.”

“Then I think you’re OK.”

I was surprised she took this news so lightly.  When I hit my fifties, I wasn’t completely shocked when I sprouted a few chin hairs.  I’d heard tales from other women about how aging could suddenly cause a plethora of unwanted bodily changes.  But no one had ever mentioned things like sudden hair growth on my my toe knuckles, and wrinkles on my knees.  I mean, who gets wrinkles on their knees besides elephants and rhinos?  Maybe I wasn’t actually turning into a werewolf, I thought.  Maybe I was turning into a woolly mammoth instead.

After I got home from the dermatologist, I called a friend who was the smartest person I knew — not a certified specialist in anything, but she had encyclopedic knowledge of every inane thing on the planet.

“I’m growing hair on my toes, and I have wrinkled knees,” I told her.  “What the heck is going on?”

“You have kninkles?” she said.

“What?”

“Kninkles,” she repeated.  “Knee wrinkles.”

“They really have a name for that?”

“Sure.  It’s a thing.”

“I know it’s a Hollywood thing,” she said.  “Don’t worry.  You can get treatment for that.”

I shuddered to think how they could remove my knee wrinkles with anything other than a clothes iron.

“You’re the same age as me.  Do you have kninkles?”

“No.  I have cankles.”

“Is that a Hollywood thing too?”

“No.  It’s a retirement community thing.”

“There’s something to look forward to,” I replied.

“I also have a problem with my weenus,” she said.

“Excuse me?  Your what?”

“My weenus.  It’s the loose skin around your elbow.  I have a lot of it.”

As we spoke, I realized somewhat comfortingly that I wasn’t alone with my aging issues.  I also realized there were a lot of dumb body terms.  But most importantly, I realized I could either fight an expensive, unwinnable fight to beat the clock, or I could accept these natural changes with acceptance and grace.  There were a lot of women out there who looked gorgeous with their gray hair and smile lines.  Not too many who looked great with beards, though.

“I think I can live with the kninkles ,” I told her.  And  can pluck the chin hairs.  But what about the hair on my toes?”

“That’s a Neanderthal thing,” she said.  “Can’t help you there.”

~ Tracy Beckerman is the author of the Amazon Bestseller, “Barking at the Moon: A Story of Life, love and Kibble.”
COPYRIGHT 2024 CREATORS.COM

Fascinating Stuff

  • Glass blowers in Lauscha, Germany, are world-famous for making two things:  handblown glass Christmas ornaments and prosthetic glass eyes,  In the 1800s, they began producing the Christmas ornaments for which they’ve become famous.  Around the same time, local glass blower Ludwig Muller-Uri started making prosthetic eyes from glass.  His descendants are still in that business today.
  • We associate macadamia nuts with Hawaii because most of the world’s macadamia nut supply is grown there.  But the nuts originated in the rainforests of Australia, where Indigenous people called thim “jindil” or “boombrera.”  European botanists working in Australia in the early 19th century gave the nuts the scientific name Macadamia integrifolia in honor of John Macdam, a Scottish-born chemist who lived and worked in Australia at the time.
  • The first Academy Award for best makeup and hairstyling was won by Rick Baker for his work on the 1981 film “An American Werewolf in London.”  The category has been included in the Oscars nearly every year since.  Baker has received a total of 11 nominations and won the Oscar seven times, most recently for the 2010 film “The Wolfman.”
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower was the first sitting U.S. president to travel in a helicopter.  On July 12, 1957, a Bell H13J helicopter took off from the White House lawn with Eisenhower and a Secret Service officer aboard.  The flight to the presidential retreat at Camp David was an evacuation drill designed to protect the president in the event of a Soviet nuclear attack.  It started the practice of using helicopters to transport the president over distances for which airplanes or automobiles would be impractical.
  • Among the oldest telephone area codes in the United States is New Jersey’s 201, which covered the entire state, including the town of Murray Hill, where Bell Labs (now Nokia Bell Labs) was headquartered.  It’s no surprise that the Bell engineers who devised the system began the numbering close to home!  (Second in numerical order is 202 for Washington, D.C.)  The first direct-dial long-distance telephone call occurred on Nov. 10, 1951, when the mayor of Englewood, New Jersey, phoned the mayor of Alameda, California.
  • The 80-mile structure known as Hadrian’s Wall in northern England was commissioned by the Roman emperor Hadrian shortly after he came to power in A.D. 117.  It was built as a military fortification to mark the boundary between Roman lands and “barbarian” territory.  Along the wall are small forts, built at intervals of 1 Roman mile — the equivalent of 1,000 paces.  Those structures, some of which have survived to this day, are called milecastles.

COPYRIGHT 2024 LESLIE ELMAN
DISTRIBUTED BY CREATORS.COM

Day Maker Readable Art

7 replies
  1. Trent Garrison says:

    So love Jerry Clower! His brand of humor will likely die with his generation… Great storyteller who could use words to paint a vivid mental picture of exactly what he was talking about. Master of words, simple and poignant. Thanks for making my day!

    Reply
    • Cheryl Clarson says:

      Trent – hi!

      100% agree regarding Jerry Clower! Great storyteller whose words indeed paint a vivid mental picture of exactly what he was talking about.

      Fun fact –
      My grandparents – waaaay back in the day — had the old school LP records – it was piped into a stereo speaker system at their home — and Jerry Clower was my favorite!

      We’d sit at the dinner table (noon – that’s what farmer’s and ranchers call it) Ha!

      And we’d take like 30 minutes, still sitting at the table for a lot of laughter to listen to Jerry Clower, from Yazoo, Mississippi!

      I’ll never forget it.

      I’m so grateful that University Mississippi Press has granted Daymaker permission to reprint his articles (of course for a small fee to both both publisher and family members).

      Thanks, Trent!
      We appreciate you for your time in engaging and sharing.

      LAUGHTER ALL AROUND!

      Reply
  2. Carol says:

    Fantastic movie poster art!

    Don’t know where Leslie Ellman gets her facts but they are amazing. If I can remember even a fraction of them I’ll sure dazzle my friends.

    Love the issue. Thank you, DayMaker, for once again making my day.

    Reply
    • Cheryl Clarson says:

      Hi Carol!

      The old school movie poster art is absolutely fabulous! The artists – don’t know for sure – but, perhaps, they did it on an easel as opposed to computers. I’d like to think that anyway.
      That kind of art — like the sign artists — who once made the most beautiful one of a kind signage. Not computer generated.

      And, yes, I love Leslie Elman’s fascinating facts as well.

      Thank you, Carol, for reading + engaging.

      SIGNIFICANT!

      Reply
  3. Marty says:

    Jerry Clower is so gifted and as always brings a laugh. Today’s comment: The fellow said, “Well, there ain’t very much between you and a fool, is it?” Marcel said, “Nothing but a fence.” Here’s my takeaway: The more I read of Jerry Clower the more I’m reminded of my own Dad. He was a master at quick wit. Thankfully he was never sarcastic but oh so gifted with his humorous one liners. Thanks Daymakers for the opportunity to visit my Dad in such memory.

    Reply
    • Cheryl Clarson says:

      Hi Marty –
      Jerry Clower, in my opinion was one of the funniest slice of life writers/comedians of all times.

      Love that it brought back memories of your dad who was also quick witted!
      Your dad must’ve been super cool for people to hang out with and wait for the one-liners in an every day sort of situation!

      HAPPINESS!

      JOY!

      Reply

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