Wednesday Reader April 10

MEDITERRANIAN LAYER DIP + TRIVIA + QUICK QUESTION + INSPIRATION

Hello Outstanding readers!

Presenting Daymaker’s Wednesday Reader on this day April 10th –

Lots of fun and joy today!

Beginning with:

QUICK QUESTION
Undoubtedly my immediate “ick” is in a grocery store when I witness a kid or adult absolutely full-out sneeze or cough (not covering their mouths) on the buggy handle-bar.  Seriously?  Totally makes me never forget to grab a few or more sanitizer wiper-deals and wipe the handle bar of any cart I grab to do my shopping.
Just “ick” You?

LESLIE ELMAN’S
Trivia via Pop Quiz and Fascinating Stuff is intriguing + entertaining + offers material for all of us to find a twinkle in our eye(s) and introduce/share interestings in a 1-2-3 + group of people should conversation lend itself to such.

I LOVE the tiny -GIANT story about IN CASE YOU PASS BY A BUS STOP.   A thought-ful, problem-solved read.

MEDITERRANEAN LAYER DIP
Pretty sure we all know of the fan-favorite “taco style 7 layer dip” * drum roll * —  Introducing another outstanding dip – not as well known – yet! STELLAR!

TRACY BECKERMAN’S column calls me out –
Yep, I’ve graduated to the “I need eyeglasses – night and day” gang.
As those close to me would tell ya, I’m THE QUEEN of sunglasses and they’re RX.  I wear them inside and outdoors and I sport them from early morning until it gets too dark to see.  Yes, accessory piece ++ very necessary for me to see properly.

THANKS ALL FOR JOINING US TODAY
We sure appreciate you + thoughts + sharing.
You’re totally gifts and we are grateful.

CATCH YA FRIDAY!
OH!
STEPHANIE’S CHIC ON THE CHEAP
column this Friday is a you won’t wanna miss it along with a few other gathered pieces of you won’t wanna miss either!

FRIDAY
SAME TIME
SAME PLACE

POP Quiz

POP QUIZ

  1. WHICH RAILROAD FROM THE BOARD GAME MONOPOLY WAS NOT A REAL-LIFE RAILROAD?
    a) B&O
    b) Pennsylvania
    c) Reading
    d) Short Line
  2. A TANNER IS A PERSON WHO WORKS WITH WHICH OF THESE MATERIALS?
    a) Glass
    b) Leather
    c) Stone
    d) Wood
  3. DIGITALIS, MADE FROM THE PURPLE FOXGLOVE PLANT, IS A MEDICATION MAINLY USED TO TREAT CONDITIONS RELATED TO WHICH ORGAN OF THE HUMAN BODY?
    a) Eyes
    b) Heart
    c) Liver
    d) Skin

Wednesday Reader April 10

QUICK QUESTION

WHAT’S YOUR
IMMEDIATE “ICK”?

Wednesday Reader April 10

POP QUIZ ANSWERS

  1. The Short Line railroad from the board game Monopoly wasn’t a real railroad.
  2. A tanner is a person who turns raw animal hides into leather.
  3. Digitalis, made from the purple foxglove plant, is a medication mainly used to treat conditions related to the heart.

~ COPYRIGHT 2024 LESLIE ELMAN
DISTRIBUTED BY CREATORS.COM

JUST IN CASE YOU PASS A BUS STOP ON A STORMY NIGHT

You are driving along in your car on a wild, stormy night.  You pass by a bus stop, and you see three people waiting for the bus:

  1. An old lady who looks as if she is about to die.
  2. An old friend who once saved your life.
  3. The perfect man (or) woman you have been dreaming about.

Which one would you choose to offer a ride to, knowing that there could only be one passenger in your car?  Think before you continue reading.

This is a moral/ethical dilemma that was actually used as part of a job application.  You could pick up the old lady, because she is going to die, and thus you should save her first; or you could take the old friend because he once saved your life, and this would be a perfect chance to pay him back.  However, you may never be able to find your perfect dream lover again.

The candidate who was hired (out of 200 applicants) had no trouble coming up with his answers.

I love this, I may actually use it sometime for an interview situation.

WHAT DID HE SAY?

He simply answered:

“I would give the car keys to my old friend and let him take the lady to the hospital.  I would stay behind and wait for the bus with the woman of my dreams.”

Never forget to Think outside the Box.

~ author unknown – From my beautiful collection of emails
this one circa 2016

WHAT MAKES YOU HAPPY
DOESN’T NEED TO MAKE
SENSE TO OTHERS.

INSTANT KARMA
DON’T SAY,
“I TOLD YOU SO.”

RIDDLE ME THIS

WHAT FLIES FOREVER,
RESTS NEVER?

Wednesday Reader April 10

MEDITERRAENEAN LAYER DIP

This incredible recipe is from Dixie who says, “regardless of where I serve/took this dip – high end Dallas people –  Oklahoma, country folks – friends, whomever – this was the first dip to be eaten off the table!  It’s really THAT good.”

HERE’S HOW SHE/WE MAKE IT:

  • 1 large seedless cucumber, long – English type works best
  • 1 cup cherry or grape tomatoes, halved
  • 1/2 medium red onion, sliced thin
  • 1 TBSP extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 TBSP fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tsp dried Italian herb mix
  • 1 cup plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 TBSP fresh dill or 1 tsp dried dill
  • 1 1/2 cups prepared Hummus
  • 1/3 cup pitted Kalamata olives, chopped
  • 1/2 cup feta cheese, crumbled
  • 1/4 cup fresh curly parsley

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Cucumber tomato mix; dice one half of the cucumber and add to a large bowl, along with the the tomatoes, red onion, olive oil, 2 TBSP lemon juice, garlic powder, and half of the dried Italian herb mix.  Season with salt and black pepper to taste and stir to combine.
    Cover and set aside until ready to use.
  2. Tzatzki sauce: shred remaining cucumber with a box grater and place in another large bowl.  Add the Greek yogurt , minced garlic, dill, and the remaining Italian seasoning, lemon juice.  Season with salt and pepper to taste and stir well to combine.  Cover and set aside until ready to use.
  3. Spread the prepared hummus into a uniform layer on small serving platter (or in an 8″x 8″ casserole dish), then top with the Tzatziki sauce.
  4. Use a slotted spoon or strainer to drain excess liquid from the seasoned tomato, red onion, and cucumber mixture before spreading on top of the Tzatizki sauce.
  5. Sprinkle on top the Kalamata olives, followed by the crumbled Feta and fresh chopped parsley.
  6. Serve with Pita chips.
  7. ENJOY!

RIDDLE ANSWER

WIND

Water Sppites

LOST IN SUBURBIA

WHO TURNED OUT THE LIGHTS?
BY TRACY BECKERMAN

When the time came to get new eyeglasses, I decided I was ready for an upgrade.  The optician told e I could get transition lenses that would turn dark when I was in the sun, so instead of having a regular pair of eyeglasses and a second pair of prescription sunglasses, I’d have one pair that would do everything.  If I could just get them to cook dinner, they’d be perfect.

They were wonderful in concept, but when they arrived and I took them out for a spin, I realized they didn’t just get dark, they got really, really dark, and left me looking like a celebrity trying to avoid the paparazzi, an extremely tired lemur or Ray Charles.  The biggest issue, though, was that whenever I went inside, I was blind as a bat.  This is actually a pretty strange comparison, considering bats are nocturnal and able to find their way around in the dark just fine.  Unfortunately I do not have any echolocation abilities like a bat to help guide me around in the dark corners.  This meant I spent a lot of time walking into walls until the lenses faded.

Being a mother had somewhat prepped me for this experience, having had to stumble around in the dark for years, answering my kids’ calls for help dealing with monsters under the bed in the middle of the night.  But back then, my vision had been sharp, and I acclimated pretty quickly to the light changes.  These days, though, there was nothing sharp about me except my acute sense of smell, which does not serve one well when one has a dog with gas issues.  But that’s another column.

In the meantime, I tried to decide if a few bumps on my forehead were worth the convenience of not having to switch glasses every time I went in and out throughout my day.

Wondering if there were perhaps a compromise, I stopped by the optician and asked if there was anything he could to do to help with the issue before I ended up accidentally walking into the men’s room, getting locked in a meat freezer or trapped in an indoor snake enclosure.

“We can’t really speed up the time it takes for the lenses to go back to normal,” said the technician.  “But you could take the glasses ofF when you enter a building for a few minutes until they readjust.”

“But I need glasses to see,” I said.

“Yeah, I could see how that would be a problem,” he replied.  “Get it?  SEE how that would be a problem?”  He laughed.

I shook my head.  I needed an optician, but somehow I’d ended up with Jerry Seinfeld.

When I got home, I bumped into my front door and then greeted a coat I thought was my husband.

“Hey, honey, guess, what?”  I heard my husband say from another part of the room.  “I decided to get transition lenses in my glasses, too.  How do you like yours?”

“They’re great,” I said.  “Just make sure you get the package that includes concussion insurance.”

~ Tracy Beckerman is the author of the Amazon Bestseller, “Barking at the Moon:  A Story of Life, Love and Kibble”
COPYRIGHT 2024 CREATORS.COM

FASCINATING STUFF

FASCINATING STUFF

  • Halley’s comet is visible from earth every 75 years, which means that some people have the potential to witness it twice in a lifetime.  Samuel Clemens, better known as Mark Twain, was on of those people.  He was born in November 1835, a year that Halley’s comet was visible from earth.  He died in 1910 — 75 years later, when the comet made its next appearance.  We may never see the the like of Mark Twain again, but Halley’s comet will be back in view in 2061.
  • Renaissance painters were particular about their pigments, using the finest colors at their disposal, including gold, in their work.  Most costly of all was brilliant ultramarine blue, made of lapis lazuli from the mountains of Afghanistan, which was ground to a fine powder and mixed with various oils and resins.  Because of its cost, ultramarine usually was reserved for devotional art, and even then for only the most important element of a painting, such as the brilliant blue robes of the Virgin Mary.
  • In 1879, Walter P. Phillips devised the Phillips Telegraphic Code “for the rapid transmission by telegraph of press reports, commercial and private telegrams, and all the matter sent by wire or cable.”  That’s a very long title for a manual that standardized code for keeping telegraph messages as short as possible (because telegraph fees were calculated based on message length).  It’s now obsolete, but it left us a legacy.  The acronym SCOTUS, for Supreme Court of the United States, came from the Phillips Code.
  • What do 97 percent of the countries in the world have in common?  Membership in the Universal Postal Union.  Founded in 1874, the UPU is the international organization that ensures cooperation and industry standardization among postal service throughout the wold.  Today 192 countries, with more than 677,000 post offices belong to the UPU.
  • The word “Subaru” in Japanese means “to unite” or “to cluster.”  It’s also the Japanese name for the constellation Pleiades, commonly known as the Seven Sisters.  So why does the logo of automobile manufacturer Subaru have six stars instead of seven?  Because only six of the stars in the constellation are readily visible to the naked eye.  Most sky watchers, if they’re patient, will eventually detect seven.  Trained observers have counted dozens of stars in the cluster.
  •  Earthworms spend most of their time underground, but they’re drawn to the surface during rain showers because it’s easier for them to migrate over moist soil.  This characteristic earthworm behavior has led seagulls to develop an unusual behavior of their own:  Seagulls stamp their feet on the ground to imitate the sound of falling rain.  This draws earthworms to the surface.  And when the worms reveal themselves, the seagulls eat them.

~ COPYRIGHT 2024 LESLIE ELMAN
DISTRIBUTED BY CREATORS.COM

Day Maker Readable Art

8 replies
  1. Carol says:

    Absolutely LOVED the bus stop story. What a creative answer!!! Fascinating Stuff really was fascinating.

    I’ve long admired the Subaru logo – to the point that I’ve thought of buying the car just for the logo – but I digress. I had no idea it represented an actual constellation. Interesting!

    The Mediterranean dip has some of my favorite ingredients (hummus, greek yogurt, Tzatzki sauce). It will be perfect to take it to our next monthly potluck dinner in a couple of weeks.

    Ready to tackle the day!

    • Cheryl Clarson says:

      Agree, Carol –

      The bus story was a cool read especially the “johnny-on-the-spot” quick answer. That guy totally had/has “problem solver” at a big time company/corporation in his future!

      I thought the Subaru Trivia was quite fascinating, as well. Subaru absolutely has a great/memorable logo! Same as Tesla. Big fan of both.

      Yum-o to the Mediterranean dip for sure.

      Love your, “Ready to tackle the day!” sign off. I’m gonna start using it, as well.

  2. Marty says:

    Daymaker asks, “WHAT’S YOUR IMMEDIATE “ICK?’ Well that’s easy. Just yesterday we received our water bill (which has nearly doubled in the last year) stating the new water saving solution from our “SEWER DISTRICT” that we can now have free drought-proof water from our EchoWater Resource Recovery Facility. Bring your own containers. Photo was shown of a Toilet and TP. — Now that was a mighty ICK!

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