Wednesday Reader August 17 2022 | Blooming Tree Rie Cramer

WEDNESDAY READER | August 17

Greetings friends,

How’s your world?  My wonderful, cool neighbors made smoked meatloaf and knowing it’s my very favorite, delivered to me a personal loaf.  Life is good!  I’ll be posting the recipe soon.  It’s sooooooo good.  Voila – Wednesday Reader, enjoy.  Have the best day.

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POP QUIZ

    1. CREATED BY MARINE BIOLOGIST STEPHEN HILLENBURG, PATRICK STAR THE STARFISH IS A CHARACTER IN WHICH ANIMATED SERIES?
      a) Aquaman
      b) Bubble Guppies
      c) Splash and Bubbles
      d) SpongeBob Squarepants
    2. THE DE BEERS GROUP OF COMPANIES IS MOST CLOSELY ASSOCIATED WITH WHAT INDUSTRY?
      a) Brewing
      b) Diamond mines
      c) Insurance
      d) Railroads
    3. MALAYSIAN APAM BALIK, GREEK TIGANITES AND HUNGARIAN PALACSINTA ARE TYPES OF WHAT?
      a) Folk songs
      b) Horse carriages
      c) Pancakes
      d) Shoes
Wednesday Reader August 17 2022

QUICK QUESTION

IF YOUR FAMILY HAD A MASCOT, WHAT WOULD IT BE AND WHY?

Wednesday Reader August 17 2022

POP QUIZ ANSWERS

  1.  d) SpongeBob Squarepants
  2.  b) Diamond mines
  3.  c) Pancakes

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BIRD BLURBS

  • Free as a bird
  • Bird brain
  • Happy as a Lark
  • Mad as a wet hen
  • Naked as a Jaybird
  • Proud as a Peacock
  • As the Crow flies
  • Wise as an Owl
  • Eat Crow
  • Eagle eye
  • For the birds
  • Goose bumps
  • Lame Duck
  • A little bird told me
  • Night Owl
  • Swan song
  • Ugly Duckling
  • Sing like a bird
  • Birds of a feather

MATURITY ISN’T A PRODUCT OF GROWING OLDER.  IT’S A PRODUCT OF GROWING WISER.

(( Starve the Landfills.  Recycle.))

RIDDLE ME THIS

WHAT HAS A BOTTOM AT THE TOP?

Wednesday Reader August 17 2022
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POPPY SEED DRESSING

Hello, fabulous dressing!  This dressing is greatness drizzled on a fruit salad, cabbage salad with thinly sliced red onions and sliced avocado, or Butter lettuce salad with thinly sliced, peeled apples (of choice) and sliced avocado.

In a blender:
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 tsp dry mustard powder
2 tsp salt
2/3 cup white vinegar
1 small yellow onion, chopped
2 cups vegetable oil

Blend for a minute and then add:
3 TBSP Poppy seeds

Pulse the blender a couple of quick times to distribute the poppy seeds.  Store in an airtight container.

RIDDLE ANSWER

YOUR LEGS

Wednesday Reader August 17 2022
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TWISTER COMING

“Twister,” came out when I was in junior high.  I loved that movie.  It had action, suspense and heart, and it defined my wardrobe for the next 18 months or so.  I became obsessed with Helen Hunt’s white tank top and baggy khaki cargo pants.  It was the epitome of independent adventurer, and I wore that outfit as many times as I could get away with each week, despite my being told I looked uncool and was dressed in the “colors of an onion.”

What did they know?  Clearly, they hadn’t seen the magic that was “Twister.”

Besides fashion inspiration, I had three other major takeaways from the movie.  As the daughter of a psychologist, I thought the sex therapist’s relationship with her patients seemed highly unhealthy.  Two, Bill Paxton was my first man crush.  And three, tornadoes are awesome!

For years afterward, I wanted to be a storm chaser.  The thrill of getting to be in a tornado (possibly even having my house destroyed!) filled my imagination.  It was the same gleeful ignorance that makes all kids wish they could break an arm so friends could sign their sweet neon orange cast.

More often than not, it’s the movies that breed these absurd notions of awesome.  Basically, every Disney movie made me wish for the early demise of my parents so I could go on some sort of epic adventure.  The moment Clara learned to walk again in “Heidi,” I knew that my life would never be complete unless I became wheelchair bound.  Similarly, “The Wizard of Oz” and “Twister” made tornadoes a bucket list experience.

I went to college in Ohio, potential tornado country, and recall being disappointed when I graduated without a single raucous storm.

Perhaps this is why we were completely unprepared when just after putting our children to bed, my husband and I were greeted by an ear-piercing bullhorn sound radiating from our phones.  “TORNADO WARNING,” the message read.

Huh.  Ok.  Good to know.  I clicked off the alarm, sat on the couch and turned on Netflix.

It took a full minute until I thought that perhaps a storm notification accompanied by an eardrum-bursting sound should be responded to with more than just a “huh.”

I took to Facebook.  It may be a hotbed of Russian-created propaganda, but it was the best place to see pics of circling skies headed directly toward your house.  I checked on the page of a neighborhood that is closer to downtown.  People reported hearing tornado sirens being blasted, something we can’t hear all the way out in the wild.

I asked whether this means we have to go to a basement.  In a matter of seconds, about a dozen people responded simply, “Yes!”

Huh, OK.  Good to know.

But now, what to do?

Perhaps it was because of my love for Bill Paxton and for Helen Hunt’s fashion choices that I had never prepared for a tornado despite having moved to tornado country.  When I lived in LA, my house was earthquake-ready as one could be.  Everything was fastened to the walls.  I kept sneakers next to the bed.  I had an earthquake kit in every room and had mapped out endless escape routes and hiding places.  But for a tornado?  I dunno.  Isn’t there something about a bathtub?

We reluctantly woke the kids and took them down into our scary unfinished basement, which is known to house mice, spiders and snakes.

You know that moment in every slasher film when the good guys are running from the machete wielding maniac and they somehow find themselves in a shed full of more machetes?  That’s kind of what it felt like.  Boxes strewn about, blocking every path.  The floor covered in shattered glass.  Creepy-crawlies lurking in every corner.  The kids were definitely not going back to sleep.

We did our best.  I found an old portable crib and put both kids inside.  We tried to turn it into a game.  Huddled together, at the bottom of the basement stairs, we waited for the swirling winds to pass.  And they did, with zero damage.

I think I’m over my desire to be in a tornado now.  But I am absolutely busting out my white tank top and cargo pants.  I have earned them.

~ Katiedid Langrock archives, copyright 2018 Creators

Fascinating Stuff

  • Started in 1915 by immigrants from a Portuguese island group of Madeira, the Feast of the Blessed Sacrament in New Bedford, Rhode Island, is the largest Portuguese feast in the world.  More than 100,000 people attend the four-day festival each summer, consuming an estimated 13 tons of cacoila – spicy, tender pulled pork served on crusty Portuguese rolls.
  • Guitar picks were made from tortoise shell until the 1970s, when harvesting tortoise shell was banned because it seemed unreasonable that endangered sea turtles should die to provide the world with bits and bobs like guitar picks.  To fill the gap, inventor Jim Dunlop devised Tortex, a synthetic, more enironmentally friendly “tortoise shell.”  It’s still used for picks today, although some guitarists have a different idea of what a pick should be.  ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons picks with a Mexican peso coin, and Queen’s Brian May uses a silver British sixpence.
  • It can be tough to put a finger on precisely when and where a cultural phenomenon is born, but prevailing wisdom says that hip-hop was born in the Bronx in 1973 and that Jamaican-American DJ Clive Campbell made it happen.  At a party for his sister Cindy, her brother — aka Kool Herc — devised a way to keep the party, well .. hopping by playing and repeating the instrumental breaks from popular songs, bouncing between two turntables.  The party crowd loved it, and the love hasn’t stopped since.
  • If you ever doubted the need for proofreaders, I call your attention to the “Wicked Bible” of 1631.  The printers publishing that edition of the King James Bible should have paid closer attention to the typesetting of the Ten Commandments.  A single “not” was conspicuously absent from commandment No. 7, thus exhorting readers to commit adultery.  Oops!  Most copies of that printing were destroyed, but a handful survive to this day.
  • As annoying as common house flies can be, you could have worse fly problems to contend with.  The Gauromydas heros fly, found in Brazil and other parts of South America, has a body 3 inches long.  It’s considered to be the largest fly on earth, although there are related species that grow nearly that big.

~ Leslie Elman archives, Trivia bits trademark

Day Maker Readable Art

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