Wednesday Reader June 7 | Mettower

WEDNESDAY READER | JUNE 7

Greetings friends!  And Wednesday …

Presenting Wednesday Reader.

I love the weirdness of our English language.  Ha!  Makes me think about it every time I use a word or phrase that really makes little sense.  Oxymoron sort of stuff.

Nonetheless – we all get it.

Leslie Elman’s Pop Quiz and Fascinating Facts … are the bomb-a-reno.

My answer to Quick Question – “What Values are Most Important” … The teachings of those who have gone before me (my grandparents, my dad, great aunts and uncles) – all so valuable as I remain here on planet earth and remembering what they taught me by their “walk in life.”

I’ll add – close friends – LAUGHTER with those who share a kindred spirit sort of thing …  All of us still on planet Earth who continue to Walk our walk and enjoy time with one another!  Never know what we’ll pick up along our journey – that is VALUABLE.

How about you?

As Always, we thank you for sliding by and giving us a piece of your day.  Gratitude.

Have a great day. We’ll see ya Friday!

POP Quiz

POP QUIZ

  1. WHAT PLACE BECAME UNINHABITABLE AFTER THE U.S. OPERATIONS CROSSROADS IN 1946?
    a) Antipodes Islands
    b) Bechar Province, Algeria
    c) Bikini Atoll
    d) Cogo, Equatorial Guinea
  2. ILLUSTRATOR GRACE DRAYTON CREATED THE RED-CHEEKED KIDS USED FOR DECADES IN ADS FOR WHAT PRODUCT?
    a) Alka-Seltzer
    b) Campbell’s Soup
    c) Mott’s Apple Juice
    d) Oreo cookies
  3. IN CHEMISTRY, WHICH OF THESE MAKES “HEAVY WATER” HEAVY?
    a) Deuterium
    b) Hydrochloric acid
    c) Lead
    d) Salt

Wednesday Reader June 7

QUICK QUESTION

WHAT VALUES ARE MOST IMPORTANT TO YOU?

5 For Friday | Joy & Inspiration

POP QUIZ ANSWERS

  1. Bikini Atoll became unsafe for habitation after Operation Crossroads, the U.S. nuclear weapons test in 1946.
  2.  Illustrator Grace Drayton created the Campbell’s Kids for Campbell’s soup.
  3.  Heavy water or deuterium oxcide, contains the the hydrogen isotope deuterium, or heavy hydrogen.

~ Leslie Elman is the author of “Weird But True: 200 Astounding, Outrageous and Totally Off the Wall Facts.”
COPYRIGHT 2023 LESLIE ELMAN
DISTRIBUTED BY CREATORS.COM

WEIRD ENGLISH

Let’s face it – English can be a crazy language.  Here’s a little proof:

  • There is no egg in eggplant, no ham in hamburger, neither apple nor pine in pineapple.  And while no one knows what is in a hot dog, you can be pretty sure it isn’t canine.
  • English muffins were not invented in England nor French fries in France.
  • Sweetmeats are candies, while sweetbreads, which aren’t sweet, are meat.

We take English for granted.  But if we explore its paradoxes:

  • Quicksand can work slowly.
  • Boxing rings are square.
  • Guinea pigs are neither from Guinea nor are they pigs.

And why is it:

  • Writers write, but fingers don’t fing, grocers don’t groce , and hammers don’t ham?
  • If the plural of tooth is teeth, why isn’t the plural of booth – beeth?
  • One goose, two geese.  So one moose, two meese?
  • Is cheese the plural of chose?
  • One mouse, two mice?
  • One louse, two lice?

And these:

  • If teachers taught, why didn’t preachers praught?
  • If a vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat?
  • Why do people recite at a play, and play at a recital?
  • Ship by truck or car and send cargo by ship?
  • Noses run and feet smell?
  • Park on driveways and drive on parkways?
  • How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same?
  • Wise man and wise guy are opposites?
  • When a house burns up — it burns down?
  • You fill in a form by filling it out?
  • An alarm clock goes off by going on?
  • You get in and out of a car, yet we get on and off a bus?

English is a silly language … it doesn’t know if it’s coming or going!

~ passed around in an email thread
Clever author not attributed

 

PERFECT IS AN ILLUSION

(( Starve the landfills.  Recycle. ))

RIDDLE ME THIS

WHAT GOES UP BUT NEVER COMES DOWN ?

Wednesday Reader June 7

ONE DOZEN IDEAS FOR ADORABLE APPETIZERS ON A STICK

These darling appetizer “kabobs” are a snap to make and are as delicious as they are charming.  Look for 6″ bamboo (wooden) skewers at a party store or super markets. 

Simply thread ingredients on the skewers and arrange on serving platter(s) that have been lined with lettuce leaves + fresh thyme sprigs.

  • COOKED SHRIMP + GREEN GRAPES
  • CHUNKS OF HAM + GREEN APPLE + SHARP CHEDDAR CHEESE
  • CHUNKS OF HAM + SWISS CHEESE + FRESH PINEAPPLE
  • COOKED SHRIMP + CHUNKS OF CANNED MANDARIN ORANGES
  • COOKED SHRIMP + CHUNKS OF CUCUMBER + CHERRY TOMATO HALVES
  • CHUNKS OF CANTALOUPE + CUCUMBER + HONEYDEW
  • CHUNKS OF ITALIAN SALAMI + MOZZARELLA CHEESE + GREEN OLIVES
  • CHUNKS OF HONEYDEW MELON + MUENSTER CHEESE + WHOLE STRAWBERRIES
  • A SINGLE WARM MEATBALL STABBED ON THE END OF A SKEWER
  • CHUNKS OF SMOKED DELI TURKEY + MONTEREY JACK CHEESE + CHERRY TOMATO HALVES
  • CHUNKS OF DELI ROAST BEEF + HORSERADISH CHEDDAR CHEESE + CHERRY TOMATOES
  • GREEN OLIVES + RED GRAPES + MOZZARELLA CHEESE CHUNKS

RIDDLE ANSWER

AGE

Wednesday Reader June 7

LOST IN SUBURBIA

BREAKING BAD BY TRACY BECKERMAN

I heard the smash way before I saw the victim of the smashing.

“What was that?” I yelled into the kitchen.

“Nothing,” said my husband.

“It sounds like something,” I yelled back.

“No, it’s nothing,” he insisted.

Having determined that “nothing” is generally what people say when it is actually something, but they don’t want you to think it is much of anything, I decided it was worth investigating.

I entered the kitchen and looked at the floor.  It was clear that something big and white had, in fact, met an untimely death on the kitchen floor, but it was broken in so many pieces that it was impossible to tell what it had been before it met its unfortunate end.

“What is that?” I asked, watching my husband try to pick up the larger broken pieces before he could sweep up the itty-bitty broken pieces.  The dog stood in the doorway looking on.  It was possible he had been witness to the whole smashing, but he wasn’t going to rat out the smasher.  He knew which side of the bread his kibble was buttered on.

My husband stood up holding a piece of something porcelain.

“A dinner plate.” I grabbed my heart and staggered back.

“A what?!”  I said in disbelief.

“A dinner plate,” he repeated, avoiding my eyes.

I looked at the shattered remains of my perfect set of 12 dinner dishes, now reduced to 11, and shook my head.

“I bobbled it,” he said.

“You BOBBLED it?” i repeated.  I took a deep breath.

“You know, in some countries you could be arrested for that and charged with wanton plate breaking.”

“Are you plate-shaming me?”  he said.

“Just a little,” I said.

I knew I was being hard on him, but this was a tragedy of porcelain proportions.  It had taken me years to finally have a set of 12 dinner plates, 12 salad plates, 12 cereal bowls and 12 dessert plates all in the same pattern.

After years of my kids accidentally smashing plates and bowls, I thought now that it was just the two of us, the plate-smashing days were behind us.

Of course, there would not be 10 people coming over to have dinner with us any time soon.  And in the grand scheme of things happening in the world, having only 11 dinner plates was most definitely not that important.

It was just above discovering a moth ate your sweater, but behind global warming.

Still, it was important to me, and I wasn’t sure a plate from the same set was still available.  It was possible it had been discontinued and I might have to find a lesser, lookalike plate.  Another plate posing as my plate.

Or maybe I could just find another husband.  That would work, too. Meanwhile, as my husband picked up the broken pieces of my pantry dreams, I decided I couldn’t be mad at him for something that was an accident.

“It’s OK, honey,” I finally said.  “It was just a plate.  It’s not a big deal.”

“Phew,” he said.  “So, would this be a good time to tell you about the bowl I broke last week?”

~ COPYRIGHT 2023 CREATORS You can visit Tracy Beckerman at www.tracybeckerman.com

FASCINATING STUFF

FASCINATING STUFF

  • When President George W. Bush established the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument in Hawaii in 2006, it covered 139,797 miles in the Pacific Ocean — more area than all the U.S. national parks combined.  In 2016, President Barack Obama enlarged the park area to 582,578 square miles, making it the largest marine protected area on Earth.  Its boundaries encompass the habitats of several critically endangered species, the submerged wreck of the USS Yorktown and the Battle of Midway National Memorial on Midway Atoll.
  • The heaviest bird on Earth is the ostrich.  Weighing more than 200 pounds — sometimes more than 300 pounds — it’s too heavy to fly.  So, which is the heaviest flying bird?  That would be the African kori bustard.  At an average weight of 40 pounds kori bustards are not especially aerodynamic, but once airborne, they’re reasonably good flyers.  Even so, they will usually try to outrun danger before they attempt to fly away from it.
  • Baauer’s 2013 dance song “Harlem Shake” is the most recent instrumental track to reach No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.  Prior to that, it was Jan Hammer’s, “Theme from Miami Vice,” which hit No. 1 in 1984.  Why so long between instrumental chart toppers?  It wasn’t always so.  The 1970s had 10 of them, from the Edgar Winter Group’s “Frankenstein” in 1973 to Herb Albert’s “Rise” in 1979.  And that doesn’t include Silver Convention’s 1975 hit “Fly, Robin, Fly” — not strictly an instrumental even though its lyrics contain a mere eight words.
  • The fabric pattern we call plaid in the United States is called tartan in Scotland, where a “plaid’ is a length of fabric that may be used as a blanket or (more often) worn as an accessory by men in full Highland dress.  The plaid, in the same tartan pattern as the man’s kilt, is wrapped around the chest and over the shoulder and then belted at the waist.

~ Leslie Elman is the author of “Weird But True: 200 Astounding, Outrageous and Totally Off the Wall Facts.”
COPYRIGHT 2023 LESLIE ELMAN
DISTRIBUTED BY CREATORS.COM

Day Maker Readable Art

4 replies
  1. Marty says:

    Daymaker’s question today, “What values are most important to you?” Around and around the 🎶 mulberry bush I go. Then I looked down on my lap and there was my open Bible turned to my usual morning spot — the book of PROVERBS. MY habit is reading a chapter every day day corresponding to the day of the month. Today, the 7th, I just finished reading Proverbs Ch. 7. There lies the answer to Daymaker’s question. I VALUE it’s teaching for successful living.

  2. Carol says:

    Lots of fun facts and fun to know information. I think the adorable appetizers will make some lovely light summer lunches. Looking forward to Friday!

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