East of The Sun West of The Moon Kay Nielsen

WEDNESDAY READER | September 7

Greetings Wednesday Readers!

I had super busy days on Monday and Tuesday cleaning and purging clothes in closets and drawers, readying them to take to The Salvation Army for their second time around. 

Feels good to de-clutter things around the house or property that no longer serve a purpose to me.

Here’s today’s Reader.  Enjoy!

And as always, so grateful you’re here.  Have a great day.

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POP Quiz

POP QUIZ

  1.  WHAT EUROPEAN EXPLORER LED THE 1542 EXPEDITION THAT CHARTED THE COAST OF CALIFORNIA?
    a)  Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo
    b)  Joao Vaz Corte-Real
    c)  Tristao da Cunha
    d)  Francisco Vazquez de Coronado
  2.   THE OLDEST SURVIVING ECCLESIASTICAL STAINED-GLASS WINDOW IS IN A CATHEDRAL IN WHAT CITY?
    a)  Assisi, Italy
    b)  Augsburg, Germany
    c)  Canterbury, England
    d)  Nantes, France
  3. THE ACTION IN THE BO9OK AND FILM “BLACK HAWK DOWN” TAKES PLACE DURING ARMED CONFLICT IN WHAT COUNTRY?
    a)  Bosnia
    b)  Kosovo
    c)  Rwanda
    d)  Somalia

Wednesday Reader September 7

QUICK QUESTION

IF YOU COULD KEEP ONLY 5 POSSESSIONS WHAT WOULD THEY BE?

Wednesday Reader September 7

POP QUIZ ANSWERS

  1.  a)  Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo led the 1542 European expedition that charted the  coast of California.
  2.   b)  The oldest surviving ecclesiastical stained-glass window is in a cathedral in Augsburg, Germany.
  3.   d)  The action book and film “Black Hawk Down” takes place during armed conflict in Somalia.

~ copyright 2018 Leslie Elman TriviaBits

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KIDS SAY THE DARNDEST THINGS!

The following excerpt is taken from Art Linkletter’s radio show, HOUSE PARTY, which aired 1945-1967.  Art asks the questions and the kids give their totally genuine honest answers.  Greatness!

  1. What’s your best subject in school?
    Recess.
  2.  Have you any brothers?
    Uh-huh, I have two.
    What ages?
    Ricky’s 2 months old and David’s nine months.
    That’s a pretty fast production record … do you want a sister?
    Yes!
    What does your mother say?
    She says, “Oh, puh…leeze, no!
  3.  Any brothers or sisters?
    No, but I have an idea how to get one.
    How?
    Well, I’m going to give my Mommy a lot of real sweet food so she’ll get
    fat — that’s how you get a baby.
  4. Do you want to be a bachelor?
    No.
    Why not?

    Because my dad’s a bachelor.
  5. What are you interested in becoming?
    A movie star like Marilyn Monroe.
    Why?
    I like the way she walks.
  6. Who is your favorite movie star?
    Marilyn Monroe.
    Why?
    Well you may not believe it, but she’s not as prissy as you might think.
  7.  What would you like to be?
    An elefunk.  If I was an elefunk, I’d be a fireman, ’cause I could squirt out fires with my nose.

IT’S CURIOUS THAT WE SPEND MORE TIME CONGRATULATING PEOPLE WHO HAVE SUCCEEDED THAN ENCOURAGING PEOPLE WHO HAVE NOT.

((Starve the landfills.  Recycle.))

RIDDLE ME THIS

WHAT HAS TO BE BROKEN BEFORE YOU CAN USE IT?

Wednesday Reader September 7
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ROCKIN’ SAUSAGE-PEPPER-ONION SUBS

This recipe calls for Italian sausages but, by all means, use your favorite sausage: Chicken, Beef or a combo … rock it!

2 red bell peppers, stemmed, seeded, and cut into 1/4″ wide strips
2 green peppers. stemmed, seeded, and cut into 1/4″ wide strips
2 large yellow onions, halved and sliced 1/4″ thick

3 TBSP white vinegar
2 TBSP sugar
1 TBSP vegetable oil
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper

2 pounds sweet Italian sausages

1 13″ x 9″ disposable aluminum pan
6″ good quality sub rolls

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Toss bell peppers, onions, vinegar, sugar, oil, salt, and pepper in a bowl.  Microwave, covered, until vegetables are just tender, about 6 minutes.  Pour vegetables and any accumulated juices into disposable pan.
  2. Prepare grill (gas or charcoal) one side hot and the other side cooler.
  3. Place disposable pan of peppers and onions on hotter side of grill.  Cover with foil and cook for 20 minutes, stirring every 8 minutes or so to keep from browning too much.
  4. Place sausages on cooler side of grill.  Cook to package instructions (the exact time depends on what type of sausages you choose to grill), flipping them frequently.
  5. When sausages are nearly cooked, transfer them into disposable pan with peppers and onions.
  6. Slide disposable pan to cooler side of grill.
  7. Now, remove sausages from disposable pan and place on hotter side of grill.  Cook sausages, uncovered, turning often until well browned and temped at 160 degrees or per package instructions (about 2-3 minutes).
  8. Return sausages to disposable pan with peppers and onions.  Tent with aluminum foil, and let rest 5 or more minutes.
  9. Divide sausages and vegetables among prepared sub rolls.  Serve.

~ Hippie Cowboy recipe box

RIDDLE ANSWER

AN EGG.

Wednesday Reader September 7
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NACHO PROBLEM

“I love food,” I said.  “I can’t help it.

My friend leveled me with her eyes.  “You could help it if you knew the foods you were eating.”

Less than seven seconds later, she had down-loaded four of her favorite food tracking apps onto my phone.  And so my journey of conscious eating began.

It turns out, I’m pretty boring.  The day’s calorie intake goes like this:
—-  Morning:  coffee.
Coffee.
Coffee.
Coffee.
—-  Lunch:  scone – or whatever is available at the coffee place.
Coffee.
Coffee.
—-  Dinner:  scraps from my kids’ plates of food.
Wine.
A buttload of nachos.

Fun fact:  A butt is a traditional unit of volume and equals 126 gallons — which, if one
were to put my nightly nacho consumption into a blender and mix it, would probably equal the same exact measurement I inhale.

The weird thing is that I don’t even ever notice I make nachos.  Not that I’m too surprised; nachos are delicious.  But usually when you make enough food to feed an entire caravan of sumo wrestlers, you notice.  I could fill up an entire bed of a truck with the nachos I’ve been eating, which I have to say, doesn’t sound half bad.

My husband proposed to me in the bed of a pickup truck.  He had rented the truck and thrown blankets in the back, and we had driven up the Pacific Coast Hwy, found a secret secluded spot and slept under the stars.  It was perhaps the most romantic night of my life.  But you know what could have made that evening even better?  Trading in those cozy blankets for a pool of nacho cheese in the bed of the pickup.  That’ll keep you warm on a crisp evening.  We could have thrown in a few pool noodles, and the night would have been set.

Another surprising factoid about the nightly nacho revelation was how much work is put into the preparation.  Far more effort is put forth than I do for our family dinners.  Peppers, tomatoes and onions are chopped.  Cheese grated.  Guacamole perfected.  Limes sliced.  Cilantro washed.  Jalapenos de-seeded.  Sour cream dolloped on the side.  The oven set for 450*.

After a week of chronicling my nacho intake, I switched my question from What am I eating to How could someone put so much effort and eat her weight in nachos and not even notice?

Just like the nachos epiphany, the second answer was not hard to come by.  I drink coffee all day while I work.  By day’s end, I am starving.  After the kids are in bed, it’s time to turn on the nightly news.  The news makes me rage.  I can’t handle it.  I want something comforting.  Nachos are basically the fluffy bunny slippers and Snuggle of cuisine.  You can’t get more comforting, in my book.  But even though I need to turn away from the news, I also don’t want to miss what is happening, so I can only step away for a few minutes — just enough time to cut some tomatoes.  After watching more news, I come back to rage-grate some cheese.  By the time the 11 o’clock news is on, I have let all of my physical anger on some unsuspecting homemade salsa and am heaping on my second helping of healing nachos.

This pattern may be a problem.

I told my friend of my discovery.  I also told her that I love nachos and now that I recognize my nightly vice, I don’t really have any intention of fixing it.  She recommended that I try making conscious choices throughout the day, including eating things that I love, so I’m not so hungry and not in need of comfort by day’s end.

For the past few days, I’ve been in Los Angeles for work meetings.  Hitting up my old stamping ground seemed like the perfect place to try this new theory out.  I’d have access to all the old foods I loved and no oven to cook nachos.

But my favorite Ramen place has closed.  And Sushi place.  And the Israeli place had closed, too.  Even the family-run custard place was closed for a family vacation.  After striking out on every food and restaurant I missed, I found myself in LAX eating nachos.

No regrets.

~ from the archives, copyright 2018 Katiedid Langrock

Fascinating Stuff

FASCINATING STUFF

  • The first 911 call in U.S. history was made in Haleyville, Alabama, on February 16, 1968.  Alabama Speaker of the House Rankin Fite called Rep. Tom Bevill to test the system, and that rotary-dialed call (from a red phone, no less) set in motion a nation-wide emergency calling system that handles some 240 million calls a year.
  • An old riddle asks, “Where does the Lone Ranger take his trash?”
    “To the dump, to the dump, to the dump, dump, dump!”  If you read that with the proper cadence, the famous “Lone Ranger” theme may be echoing in yourhead.  That theme comes from the overture to Gioachino Rossini’s 1829 opera, “William Tell,” the tale of the Swiss folk hero who shot an apple off his son’s head with a crossbow.  The story is eternal, and so was Rossini’s original, unabridged four-act opera, which clocked in at more than five hours long.
  • Published in 1604, Robert Cawdrey’s “Table Alphabetical” was the first dictionary of the English language.  It’s 3,000 or more entries concentrated on words that Cawdrey determined to be difficult for uneducated people (women in particular) to comprehend.  His simple definitions were charming.  “Hospitality is defined as “good entertainment for friends and strangers.”  Chaos is “a confused heap or mingle-mangle.”  And a Labyrnith is “a place so full of windings and turnings, that a man cannot find his way out.”
  • The word sybaritic, meaning luxurious or indulgent, comes from the ancient Greek city Sybaris.  Known for the luxurious lifestyle of its resident, Sybaris is reputed to have enacted the first noise ordinance in recorded history, back in the 6th century B.C.  It required artisans and trades men to do their noisy work outside the city limits.  Even roosters who crowed at sunrise were banned so as not to disturb the peace of mind of the Sybarites.
  • As of this writing, only 5 players in Major League Baseball history have played all 9 defensive positions in a single game.  The most recent was Andrew Romine of the Detroit Tigers, on Sept. 30, 2017, in a game against the Minnesota
    Twins at Target Field in Minneapolis.  (That game also marked Romine’s first appearance as catcher in an MLB game.)  The other players of this exclusive list are Bert Campaneris (Sept. 8, 1965), Cesar Tovar (Sept. 22, 1968), Scott Sheldon (Sept. 6, 2000) and Shane Halter (Oct. 1, 2000).

~   from the archives, copyright 2018 Leslie Elman, Trivia Bits

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