Wednesday Reader October 18 | Owl Web

HEART, ART, THINGS TO THINK ABOUT, SMOKY SLOPPY JOE-JOES, TRIVIA

HEY-HEY EVERYONE!

Presenting Daymaker Readable Art’s Wednesday Reader.  Terrific line-up today.

I’ve never really thought about the Quick Question regarding do fish ever get thirsty?  Ha!  Probably not.

The POWER OF PUNCTUATION “speaks” for itself.  Pretty cool.

My first pet memory was a doberman by the name of Mitzi (my dad was a big fan of dobies). We lived in Merriam, Kansas at the time.  I remember being in the front yard with her and she ran into the street and was hit by a car.  The driver stopped.  He was distraught.  Not his fault.  Just happened.  But he stopped.  I’ll never forget it.

The Smoky Joe-Joes are goodness-gracious comfort food held in both hands + the orange quarters with the sandwiches are totally the “icing on the cake” sort of thing.

Tracy Beckerman – I totally love her slice-of-life writing.  Modern day Erma Bombeck in my humble opinion.

WHAT?!  Alaska for 2 cents an acre?  Read Leslie Elman’s FASCINATING STUFF to get the scoop on that.

Thank you.  Thank you.  For popping by and reading us and giving us a comment and sharing with friends and family.  Grateful.

Have a fabulous day!  Catch ya on Friday.
Same time.  Same place.

POP Quiz

POP QUIZ

  1.   WHAT WAS THE NAME OF DREW BARRYMORE’S CHARACTER IN “E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL”?
    a) Dolly
    b) Gertie
    c) Honey
    d) Zuzu
  2.   HOW MANY PAIRS OF CHROMOSOMES ARE IN A HEALTHY HUMAN CELL?
    a) 10
    b) 23
    c) 32
    d) 66
  3. WHO’S THE VILLAIN IN THE “FRIDAY THE 13TH FILM FRANCHISE?
    a) Ghostface
    b) Freddy Krueger
    c) Michael Myers
    d) Jason Voorhees

Wednesday Reader October 18

QUICK QUESTION

DO YOU THINK FISH EVER GET THIRSTY?

Halloween Spook

POP QUIZ ANSWERS

  1.  Drew Barrymore played Gertie in “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.”
  2.  A healthy human cell contains 23 pairs of chromosomes.
  3.  Jason Voorhees is the villain in the “Friday the 13th” film franchise.

~ COPYRIGHT 2023 LESLIE ELMAN
DISTRIBUTED BY CREATORS.COM

THE POWER OF PUNCTUATION

It.  Is.  Very.  Weird.  That.  When.  You.  Read.  This.  Your.  Voice.  Pauses.  Between.  Words.

“WHEN I HEAR SOMEBODY SIGH, ‘LIFE IS HARD; I’M ALWAYS TEMPTED TO SAY, ‘ COMPARED TO WHAT?'”

~ Sydney J. Harris ~

(( Remember your first pet?  What was his/her name? ))

RIDDLE ME THIS

WHAT GOES AROUND THE WORLD BUT STAYS IN THE CORNER?

Wednesday Reader October 18

SMOKY SLOPPY JOE-JOES

This recipe replaces the less-than-impressive Sloppy Joes made with a can of this and a packet of that and squirts of catsup.  This is top-shelf delicious.  The list of ingredients looks a little long, but it’s easy-peasy.
Ready?  Set.  Go!

START BY COMBINING IN A BOWL AND LET SET FOR ABOUT 15 MINUTES:

  • 1 1/4 pounds lean ground beef
  • 1/2 tsp soda

IN THE MEANTIME, IN A LARGE SKILLET, OVER MEDIUM HEAT:

  • 2 TBSP butter and saute —
  • 1 medium onion, small diced
  • 1 green pepper, small diced

WHEN ONION AND GREEN PEPPER ARE SOFT,  ADD BURGER/SODA MIXTURE PLUS:

  • 2 tsp smoked paprika (if you don’t have smoked paprika in your spice collection – write it down on your grocery list right this second.  So good added in many fall/winter recipes — like chili, pinto beans, navy bean soup …)
  • 3/4 tsp dry mustard
  • 1/2 tsp oregano
  • 3/4 tsp cumin powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 TBSP Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 – 14 ounce can tomato sauce
  • 2 TBSP tomato paste

COOK EVERYTHING IN THE SKILLET OVER MEDIUM HEAT FOR ABOUT 20 MINUTES, STIRRING OCCASIONALLY TO GET THE BURGER AND ALL MIXED TOGETHER LIKE HAPPY CAMPERS.

BUTTER THE SOFT SIDE OF GOOD QUALITY HAMBURGER BUNS AND TOAST UNDER THE OVEN BROILER FOR A FEW MINUTES — JUST LONG ENOUGH UNTIL THE BUNS BROWN AROUND THE EDGES A BIT.

REMOVE BUNS FROM OVEN.

SPOON SMOKY SLOPPY JOE-JOE MEAT MIX ON THE BOTTOM HALF OF BUNS AND CAP WITH THE TOP HALF.

SERVE WITH OVEN ROASTED POTATOES AND FRESH ORANGES (QUARTERED).

~ Hippie Cowboy recipe box

RIDDLE ANSWER

A STAMP

Wednesday Reader October 18

LOST IN SUBURBIA

HOW DRYER I AM
BY TRACY BECKERMAN

I am well known in these parts for my unresolved appliance aggressions.  I have killed one microwave, three toaster ovens, one coffee maker and a garage refrigerator.  Well, actually, my car killed the garage refrigerator.  But I guess I am complicit because I was driving the car.

In my defense of these crimes, in most cases, the appliances were near the end of their life spans and were just looking for an excuse to die … three days after the warranties expired.

Anyway, when we moved into our new home, I was excited because the landlord told us all the appliances were new and should work properly.

Unfortunately, no one told that to the dryer.

Two days after we moved in, I went to do my first load of laundry.  The washing machine performed its duties in a very professional way.  Then I threw the small load into the dryer and set the timer for 50 minutes.  But when the timer went off and the green light changed to red and the window said “complete,” I went to pull out the clothes — they were still wet.  Not damp.  Not wettish.  Wet.  I shook my head and reset the timer.  Two minutes into the cycle, the dryer timer went off again.  And of course, the clothes were still wet.

“The dryer is messing with me,” I said to my husband.  The sensor is telling me the clothes are dry, but they’re not dry.  The dryer is a liar!”

My husband gave me the look he always gives me when I’m on some kind of household rant that he does not, under any circumstances, plan to get involved in but he knows he will get dragged into anyway.

“Just run it again,” he said.

“I did.  But it stopped after two minutes because it thought it was done.  Or maybe … it just wants me to think that it’s done.”

He shook his head.  “Try a different setting.”

I nodded and turned the dryer to “Cotton Dry” instead of “Timed Variable,” which had a set 4o-minute time it would dry for.  But two minutes into the cycle, it stopped and said “complete.”

“Argh!”  I roared.  “This dryer will not dry these clothes!”

“Maybe it’s broken.”

“No, I”m pretty sure it’s laughing at me.”

While I ranted some more, my husband got off the couch with a sigh.

“Here, let me try.”

I stood back while he examined the vent and the hose and different settings.

“It looks fine,” he finally declared.  He set the timer and went back to sit down on the couch.  Forty minutes later I checked on the clothes and they were completely dry.

I glared at him.  “What did you do differently than me?”

“Nothing.  Maybe it just likes me better.”

I nodded.  “OK.  So you know what that means?”

“I’m more charming than you,” he said.

“No.  It means you get to do the laundry every week.”

Tracy Beckerman is the author of the Amazon Bestseller, “Barking at the Moon:  A Story of Life, Love, and Kibble.”
COPYRIGHT 2023 CREATORS

FASCINATING STUFF

FASCINATING STUFF

  • John Bartlett was running the University Bookstore in Cambridge, Massachusetts, when he began compiling a list of recognizable quotations from literature, largely as a resource to answer “Who said?” questions and perhaps to settle a wager or two.  He published the compilation in 1885, with 258 pages of quotes.  A mere 1,000 copies of his book were printed; they sold out in three months.  By the time of Bartlett’s death in 1905, nine editions of his “Familiar Quotations” had been published, with sales of some 300,000.
  • On October 18,1867, possession of Alaska Territory was officially transferred from Russia to the United States.  Although common wisdom said that the U.S. Secretary of State William Seward was misguided in recommending the purchase (you’ve heard of “Seward’s Folly”?), only two senators officially voted against it: William P. Fessenden of Maine and Justin S. Morrill of Vermont.  Their main objection was the expense.  Fessenden had also opposed a proposed purchase of Cuba in 1859.  Price paid for Alaska:  $7.2 million, about 2 cents per acre.
  • Maya Angelou’s amazing life as a writer is rivaled only by her amazing life before she became a writer.  In the 1940s, at age 16, she was San Francisco’s first black female streetcar “conductorette.”  She sang and danced professionally, releasing an album of calypso music and touring with a stage company of “Porgy and Bess.”  She worked at a newspaper in Egypt and was an administrator at the University of Ghana, all before the 1969 release of “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” the first of her seven autobiographies.
  • A couple times a year in the town of Yoro, Honduras, people find the ground littered with fish after a severe rainstorm.  The call it Iluvia de peces – “the rain of fish.”  It’s scientific explanation might be that heavy rains flood underground streams and drive fish to the surface.  Or it might involve tornadolike waterspouts that form at sea, suck fish out of the water and deposit them inland.  Or it could be a miracle.  Everyone has a theory; none have been confirmed.
  • The name “coleslaw” comes from the Dutch for “cabbage salad,” and while recipe variations are too many to count, cabbage is the one constant ingredient.  Anything else is just “slaw.”  The dish came to North America with Dutch settlers in New Amsterdam, now New York.  “Koolsla” recipes are in Dutch cookbooks dating back to the 17th century, involving cabbage tossed in a dressing of melted butter and vinegar and served at room temperature.

TRIVIABITS
COPYRIGHT 2023 LESLIE ELMAN
DISTRIBUTED BY CREATORS.COM

Day Maker Readable Art

4 replies
  1. Marty says:

    I loved today’s Daymaker issue including the recipe. I have been hungry for sloppy joes recently and then opened Daymaker and there it was — your SMOKY SLOPPY JOE-JOES. I made a copy of the recipe and have it in the kitchen for tonight’s meal. There isn’t a single ingredient that I don’t have in my kitchen including hamburger in the freezer. I’m smiling

    • Cheryl Clarson says:

      Hooray, Marty. Enjoy! They’re really “finger lickin'” good!

      Thanks for reading and commenting. Appreciate the fun you bring to the comment section with your written words.

      Have a fantastic day! Catch ya on Friday.

  2. Carol says:

    The first pet I remember – I must have been about 4 – was a chubby puppy of indeterminate breed bestowed on our family by a well-meaning aunt. His name, appropriately, was Chubby 😉

    Love the Halloween artwork!

    • Cheryl Clarson says:

      Greatness, Carol!

      Love your first pet memory – “Chubby.”
      Yay! “Chubby.”

      The name of your pet “Chubby” just brought back a super cool memory to me.

      My grandparents were cattle feeders outta Powell, Wyoming.
      My Uncle Jim, also a cattle feeder, outta Colorado gifted them a blue heeler pup one year – who came with the name, “Hub”.

      “Hub” was not gonna be a cattle herding dog – just a wonderful around the home property pal. And he was.

      As genetics sometimes do … “Hub” grew up to be a little (lot) “chunky” as in rectangular in size.
      And, yes, he waddled when he walked. Super friendly dog to all who met him.

      Well — his original name “Hub” — evolved into “Chub”! Ha

      Thanks so much for reading and supporting us by sharing your happy thoughts/comments.
      Grateful.

      Wishing you a fabulous Wednesday.
      Catch ya on Friday!

Comments are closed.